Cruise line halifax dating

On my first contract aboard a cruise ship, the ratio of women to men was 5 to 100.As a result, females could really pick and choose ... One of the oddest dynamics was a scramble that occurred every 14 days or so (my first ship sailed two-week voyages); the cast of characters would change as contracts ended -- and others began.

What's often amusing is that an onboard relationship is like pushing fast-forward on a remote control.

It's easy to understand why: With 500 to 2,000-plus cruise ship crew living in one place -- and with the job's natural byproduct of being months away from home at sea -- people naturally seek out companionship as they miss family and friends.

Once you've become, er, fond of someone, gaining their attention is easy since most work regular shifts, eat together in the cruise ship's mess, celebrate together at crew parties and enjoy the gossip.

On one two-week cruise, the Spanish flamenco dancer was seeing the captain.

One Belgian hostess was, for a time, sharing the Italian band leader's cabin (then later, the one occupied by the American host) and the English female singer of the duo was with the Italian saxophonist.

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It takes willpower and strength to hew to your priorities. Flaunting a relationship is not recommended -- it's neither diplomatic nor, in some cases, safe in such a confined environment. An ex of my one-time beau actually entered my cabin, pulled one of my formal gowns (my favorite, naturally) from the closet and ripped it apart with scissors, scattering sequins everywhere.

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